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A record of Henry and Phebe's intentions to be married, which caused a notice to be placed on one or more buildings in Dartmouth for public viewing. Inns were a common place for these notices if public buildings didn't exist. In the case of Dartmouth, there were no municipal buildings at that time. The notice would give anyone who objected to the marriage time to contact the town clerk.


Phebe was probably born in Rochester, Province of Massachusetts, and grew up in an area of Dartmouth that's now Fairhaven, Massachusetts. She married Henry Jenne, who was a neighbor, and had seven known children. In the mid 1790s, she, Henry and the families of their children Phebe and Henry, Jr., moved west to Saratoga County, New York, or nearby, then further west to Penfield (later called Webster), New York. She's buried in Union Hill Cemetery beside her husband. It appears their gravestone was placed some time after they died (probably after Meribah (Dexter) Jennings died in 1862), given that only the month and year of their deaths is given and the style of the stones are typical of the mid 1800s.




https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/26168807/henry-jennings#view-photo=123584494

children of Phebe Howard and Henry Jenne/Jennings:1

i. Abner, b. 1 October 1765
ii. Phebe, b. 4 February 1769
iii. Henry, b. 7 December 1771, d. 20 October 17732
iv. Temperance, b. 17 October 1772
iv. son, b. 3 June 1774, d. 15 June 1774 (see note 2)
vi. son, b. 3 June 1774, d. 15 June 1774 (see note 2)
vii. daughter, prob. b. 3 June 1774, d. 15 June 1774 (see note 2)
viii. Henry, b. abt 1776



1. Vital Records of Dartmouth, Massachusetts to the Year 1850, Vol. 1 - Births (Boston:1929), 137, 139, 140.
2. Vital Records of Dartmouth, Massachusetts to the Year 1850, Vol. 3 - Deaths (Boston:1930), 42-43. The death entries for Henry and the apparent triplets are based on one or more gravestones in Acushnet Cemetery. There was no trace of them on a site visit in 2004 and they haven't been picked up by people inputting information at findagrave.com. Most likely this was one stone made to memorialize all four children. Henry's entry refers to damage to the stone, and that was in the late 1920s. It likely deteriorated further and disappeared. Other 18th century stones in this cemetery are of brittle quality slate. Henry Jenne's parents' stones are badly deteriorated.

all text and photographs © 1998-2021 by Doug Sinclair unless where otherwise noted